1977 Peavey PA-200 Mixer Amp

There’s something about these 70’s solid state amps. They come from an era when watt ratings seemingly counted for little. They’re always far louder than they should be! It supposedly puts 120 watts into a 4 ohm cab but, I can tell you, this thing will take heads clean off shoulders when cranked.

It takes pedals extremely well and the spring reverb tank sounds incredible. Nice and old school.

This one is in super good condition. The best I’ve seen. The leather pads in the centre of the knobs are all present. Usually, they’ve long since fallen off due to the glue sucking.

Each channel has a gain (volume) knob, an effect knob (to blend in the reverb tank) and a Low and High knob. Set to 12 o’clock, the knobs are at zero. So, turn them left and you’re cutting a frequency, turn them right and you’re boosting. The amount of overall reverb is controlled by a knob to the right of the unit.

I became interested in these, as a lot of people did, after finding out the Greg Ginn, of Black Flag, used one.

PA amps make super cool guitar and bass heads. You can even split your signal and use more than one channel at a time. Great for experimenting.

Here’s a video of me playing guitar and bass through it. The dirt comes from a TC Electronic Mojo Mojo Overdrive Pedal.

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Travis Bean TB2000 Bass Guitar

So, I’ve been a Bob Weston fan since forever.. Like so many, I’ve pined after his killer bass tone for years.. I bought my first Kramer XKB-20 to see if I could get somewhere close to it.. And I did. But it wasn’t enough. The day after my wedding, I drove an 8 hour round trip to pick up a vintage Traynor TS-50B with matching 2×15.. Got even closer to the tone. But it still wasn’t quite there. I finally caved in and spent a dick ton of cash on a vintage Travis Bean TB2000 bass.. Et voila! There’s the famous tone. The grunt. The bark. The bite. All at my finger tips, whenever I choose to piss off my neighbours and crank up the Traynor in my two bedroom flat!


This thing is an absolute beast. Weighing in at a huge 12lbs, it sounds like thunder and plays like butter.


It’s mid 70’s – I’m not sure of the exact year. Serial #517. Apparently Travis Beans can be difficult to date. All original aside from the fretboard, which was removed and replaced with a new one by Kevin Burkett, who now owns Travis Bean.


It has a few small pick scrapes to the body but, for me, that only adds to the character. This bass has clearly been used and loved over the years. Well loved. In fact, it’s previous owners include Dominic from the post rock band, Mogwai, and Aluminium Axes¬†Facebook¬†page owner, Iain Quimby, who I purchased it from.



The neck design on Travis Bean guitars, is brilliant. It goes right the way through the body, increasing sustain and ensuring minimal neck dive. The quality of these things is mind blowing. It feels super well made, like it would withstand a nuclear blast.


The pickup resting right on the neck produces such a killer tone.



I think I can safely say that this is my “forever bass”.. At least until I get too old and decrepit to strap the beast round my neck and play it!

Here’s a scrappy Shellac bass cover I did using the TB2000 and my Traynor TS-50B: